December 1, 2022

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Name, image, likeness deals in high school sport? It could be on the way in Texas

High school athletes earning money from autograph sessions, social media advertisements and TV commercials is currently permitted in 10 states.

AUSTIN, Texas — On Monday, the Texas High School Coaches Association (THSCA) announced a partnership with Eccker Sports – an organization specializing in educating athletes, coaches and families on name, image and likeness.

The THSCA said multiple times in a round table moderated by KVUE’s Tyler Feldman the organization is “not promoting” name, image and likeness at the high school level, but it does acknowledge that drastic changes, including high school athletes earning money from endorsement deals, could be on the way.

“We have two different sets of lobbyists who have made us aware of proposals that will be rolled out in the legislative session,” said THSCA executive director Joe Martin. “There’s a concern that one of them will be high school athletes are allowed to participate in NIL in the same way the NCAA allows collegiate athletes to do that.”

Eccker Sports tells us high school athletes earning money from autograph sessions, social media advertisements and TV commercials is currently permitted in 10 states. Multiple in-state high school coaches have concerns about Texas being added to that list.

“If it comes down here in Texas, our coaches we have a lot on our plate already,” said Judson head football coach Mark Soto.

RELATED: LIST: UT student-athletes utilizing new NIL rules

Soto went on to tell us about the conversations he has had with college recruiters about name, image and likeness impacting their college programs.

“You’ve got a kid who may be there, maybe he’s an offensive lineman who has been there for three years, contributing to the team as a starter, then you have a freshman coming in and [the freshman] is making NIL money and [the lineman] is not,” he said.

“I’m just sitting here thinking about a high school kid that’s really not ready to handle the amount of money that may be coming through their pocketbook,” said Soto.

New proposals are expected to be presented to the Texas Legislature in January.

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