Years

Washington motorcycle fatalities increased in recent years

There have been 755 motorcycle-involved wrecks in Washington this year, 34 of which were fatal, according to state Department of Transportation data.

Six of those fatal crashes and 40 of the state’s 250 wrecks that were thought to involve serious injuries happened in Pierce County this year, according to WSDOT’s Crash Data Portal.

At least three of Pierce County’s fatal crashes were in the past month or so. A motorcyclist died in a wreck near University Place on Tuesday; another died earlier this month from a crash in Tacoma; and an accident in June killed a motorcyclist in the South Hill area.

Those statewide and Pierce County figures did not include a fatal motorcycle wreck that happened Thursday night on state Route 7 in Tacoma.

The past two years were particularly deadly for motorcyclists in the state.

The Washington Traffic Safety Commission put out a news release in May

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Parents Finally Find Their Abducted Son After Searching For 24 Years

Guo Gangtang and his wife, Zhang Wenge, searched for nearly 24 years to find their missing two-year-old son — at long last, the family was reunited

In what is surely the most heartbreaking situation any parents could imagine, two parents in China had been searching for their son, who was abducted at age two, for nearly 24 years, with his father traversing more than 310,000 miles on a motorbike displaying his child’s photo in the hopes of someday finding him safe.

At long last, the family has been reunited with their missing son, after his father, Guo Gangtang, spent two dozen years traveling across the country on his motorcycle with a photo banner on the back of it, hoping he would be reunited with his son. Their child, born Guo Xinzhen, was abducted when he was playing outside his front door on September 21, 1997, according to The New

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25 Iconic Motorcycles From the Past 125 Years

Royal Enfield Bullet

Tilemahos Efthimiadis

For more than a century, the Harley-Davidson name has been synonymous with big, loud, roaring engines. But in 2019, the legendary American manufacturer unveiled its very first electric motorcycle, and its competitor Curtiss announced three new electric bikes. As the sun rises on a new era of motorcycles, it’s time to take a look back at the bikes that came before, defining their eras and changing the way motorcycles were designed, built, and perceived.

Related: Muscle Memories: 15 Ford Cars That Defined a Generation

1942 Harley-Davidson WLA

Cycle Trader

An upgraded version of the WL that was refined for military specifications, the Harley-Davidson WLA was one of the unsung heroes of World War II and Korea. In fact, the “A” in WLA simply stood for the name of Harley’s newest and best customer: Army. A rugged, durable bike with a 740cc engine, Harley built around 90,000 of them for the Army

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Indian Motorcycle Celebrates 100 Years of Chief With Completely Reimagined 2022 Indian Chief Lineup


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2021 Indian Chief Bobber Dark Horse

MINNEAPOLIS – February 10, 2021: In 1921 Indian Motorcycle unveiled the iconic Indian Chief, one of the most historic and influential motorcycles of all time. Now, in celebration of 100 years, America’s
First Motorcycle Company is unleashing three new, totally reimagined Indian Chief models for its 2022 lineup. Combining iconic, American V-twin style with modern performance and technology, Indian Motorcycle
designed the new Chief with a simplistic and mechanical aesthetic that pays homage to the glory days of American motorcycling.

All based on a timeless, simplistic steel-tube frame and powered by Indian Motorcycle’s powerful Thunderstroke motor, the new Indian Chief, Indian Chief Bobber and Indian Super Chief offer three unique
takes on the classic American V-twin, each appealing to a slightly different rider.


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2021 Indian Chief

The new Chief provides a stripped-down riding experience where power, minimalism and attitude lead the way. It reaches

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